About the Sun and How Affects Our Skin and Eyes

Summer means that pools become the perfect recreational and refreshing space for pool owners of Miami Dade County. It is the perfect time to set the scene for hours of quality family time, as well as playtime with friends.  However, as we already have spoken about it before, with summer, exposure to the sun is inevitable, so, in order to minimize the risks of sun exposure, we have to follow some tips that dermatologists recommend.

But, what really happens to our skin with sun exposure? Why is so bad to us to get sunstroke, in other words, it is true that a badly sunburnt face or back is extremely painful, but usually it passes off in a day or two.

Sun Benefits

Well, to begin with, it is good to point out that the sun is a source of energy and brings many benefits for human beings, like:

  1. Favor the synthesis of vitamin D3 (increases the absorption of calcium and phosphorus).
  2. Strengthen bones and the immune system
  3. It influences the state of mind, since it balances the nervous system and helps fighting depression.

However, although exposure to the sun is good, exceeds is harmful, especially for the skin.

Types of Ultraviolet (UV) Rays

According to the American Cancer Society, The sun produces three types of ultraviolet (UV) rays:

  1. UVA rays are the weakest of the UV rays. They can cause skin cells to age and can cause some indirect damage to cells’ DNA. UVA rays are mainly linked to long-term skin damage such as wrinkles, but are also thought to play a role in some skin cancers.

  2. UVB rays have slightly more energy than UVA rays. They can damage the DNA in skin cells directly, and are the main rays that cause sunburns. They are also thought to cause most skin cancers.

  3. UVC rays have more energy than the other types of UV rays. Fortunately, because of this, they react with the ozone high in our atmosphere and do not reach the ground. Therefore UVC rays are not normally a risk factor for skin cancer. But they can also come from some man-made sources, such as arc welding torches, mercury lamps, and UV sanitizing bulbs that kill bacteria and other germs (such as in water, air, food, or on surfaces).

Effects of Excessive Sun Exposure

Excessive exposure to the sun not only causes harmful effects on our skin, our eyes are also negatively affected. American Academy of Ophthalmology warns us that too much exposure to UV light raises the risks of eye diseases, including cataract, growths on the eye, and cancer. Strong exposure to snow reflection can also quickly cause painful damage called snow blindness.

Growths on the eye, such as pterygium, can show up in our teens or twenties, especially in surfers, skiers, fishermen, farmers, or anyone who spends long hours under the mid-day sun or in the UV-intense conditions found near rivers, oceans, and mountains.

Diseases like cataract and eye cancers can take many years to develop, but each time we’re out in the sun without protection we could be adding damage that adds to our risks for these serious disorders.

Recommendations to enjoy the sun safely

To enjoy the swimming pool this summer in Lighthouse Point protecting our skin remember follow these simple tips. To protect our eyes from the sun all year long keep in main this Eye medical doctors advices:

  • Sun damage to eyes can occur anytime during the year, not just in the summertime, so be sure to wear UV-blocking sunglasses and broad-brimmed hats whenever you’re outside.

  • The sun’s rays can pass through haze and thin clouds.

  • Never look directly at the sun. Looking directly at the sun at any time, including during an eclipse, can lead to solar retinopathy, which is damage to the eye’s retina from solar radiation.

  • Don’t forget the kids and older family members: everyone is at risk, including children and senior citizens. Protect their eyes with hats and sunglasses.

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